Women’s Struggles – Saturday 24th November

Main reading for this seminar is:

Alldridge (2015) Defense of Commons as Feminist Struggle, Why women will save the planet, Zed books, March 2018

We would also like to suggest that people look at one of the following articles, and especially the concepts of ‘politics in feminine’ and ‘the among women’:

Liz Mason-Deese (2018) ‘From #MeToo to #WeStrike: a politics in feminine’, Viewpoint Magazine, 7 March, https://www.viewpointmag.com/2018/03/07/metoo-westrike-politics-feminine/.

Raquel Gutierrez (2018) ‘Because we want ourselves alive, together we are disrupting everything: Notes for thinking about the paths of social transformation today’, Viewpoint Magazine, 7 March, https://www.viewpointmag.com/2018/03/07/want-alive-together-disrupting-everything-notes-thinking-paths-social-transformation-today/.

For those who are interested in widening the perspective, I would recommend:

Alex Knight’s (2009) ‘Who were the witches? Patriarchal terror and the creation of capitalism’, about Silvia Federici’s 2004 book Caliban and the Witchhttps://endofcapitalism.com/2009/11/05/who-were-the-witches-patriarchal-terror-and-the-creation-of-capitalism/.

Vandana Shiva‘s (2015) ‘Hand in hand: women’s empowerment and sustainabilty’, PDF coming in further email.

Crystal Valentine (2015) #Feminism, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FCkoyTUmeQ#action=share.

The Women’s Budget Group (2018) ‘The impact of austerity on women in the UK’, https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Development/IEDebt/WomenAusterity/WBG.pdf OR Runnymeade Trust, ‘Impact of austerity on Black and Minority Ethnic women in the UK’, https://www.runnymedetrust.org/uploads/PressReleases/1%20bme_executive_summary-A3-01.pdf.

Creating curricula for new alternatives: the EarthCare project

Tuesday 3rd March, 7pm, Mint Lane

In this session I will share about ongoing work in a project called the ‘EarthCARE Global Justice Framework’ and invite reflection on the kinds of alternative world-making that it offers.

 

https://blogs.ubc.ca/earthcare/

The EarthCARE Global Justice framework emerged out of an international R&D network of eco-social learning initiatives that seek to integrate ecological, cognitive, affective, relational, and economic (EarthCARE) approaches to local and global justice. This framework is intended to push the boundaries of prevailing approaches to global change and related definitions of ‘global citizenship’, ‘development’, ‘success’, and ‘sustainability’ beyond problematic patters of simplistic analyses and engagements well documented in research (see ‘HEADS UP’ tool). The framework aims to support the design of deep learning processes that can enable CARE-ful learners to think, relate and work together differently to alleviate the effects and transform root causes of unprecedented global challenges.

The EarthCARE framework proposes a vision of deep transformational learning processes that combine practical doing (together), the building of trust (in one another), deepening analyses (of self, systems, and social and ecological complexity), and dismantling walls (between peoples, knowledges, and cultures). In this vision, intellectual engagements, the arts, ethics, cosmovisions, the environment, and embodied practices are all understood as important conduits for learning.

The EarthCARE global justice framework is unique as it combines six complementary approaches to justice that encourage ‘alternative approaches to engagement with alternatives’, moving beyond the search for universal models and problem-solving approaches towards preparing people to work together with and through the complexities, uncertainties, paradoxes, and complicities that characterize efforts to address unprecedented global challenges collaboratively today.